Claire Adler in the Star Diamond Showroom. Both rings are by Star Diamond. Necklace by Catherine Prevost. Photography by Dan Stevens

Claire Adler in the Star Diamond Showroom. Both rings are by Star Diamond. Necklace by Catherine Prevost. Photography by Dan Stevens

For advice on high-end jewellery and watches, Claire Adler is one of the most knowledgeable experts on London’s luxury scene. A regular contributor to the Financial Times, Adler also consults for a number of powerful brands including De Beers, Boodles, Piaget and Montblanc, offering advice on communication and providing client introductions. On top of this, Adler pens in-depth luxury reports, as well as speaking at some of London’s most popular luxury forums, including Walpole British Luxury and International Jewellery London. Underpinning all of this is Adler’s love for the products she specialises in. “Working within the luxury industry, it’s inspiring to meet ambitious, creative people who believe in their art, to witness their commitment to being the best while executing their craft impeccably,” explains Adler. “Whether it’s polishing diamonds in Antwerp or fitting a suit on Savile Row, I love working with successful entrepreneurs and business owners who are natural pros at putting their heart and soul into what they do.”

"It's inspiring to meet ambitious, creative people who believe in their art"

 

At the heart of this passion for luxury sits London, a city that Adler feels occupies a prestigious position in the global market. “London excels in its mix of global luxury houses and lesser-known brands,” she says. “London is now the third largest market for luxury goods in the world, with a luxury sector worth £32.2 billion according to Walpole.” A large part of this success can be attributed to the number of exciting British brands that are flourishing in the capital. “Sixth-generation family-owned British jeweller Boodles has recently doubled the size of its Bond Street store,” explains Adler. “British watchmaker Bremont, which manufactures its watch parts in Silverstone, Northamptonshire, is also in expansion mode.”

 

"London is now the third largest market for luxury goods in the world"

 

The success of London’s luxury scene also attracts talent from overseas. “Nourbel & Le Cavelier, owned by a Swiss and Lebanese duo, has a beautiful boutique in Mayfair’s Burlington Arcade, and Star Diamond, founded by partners from Belgium and Armenia, also owns a discreet appointment-only gallery on Dover Street,” continues Adler. Although the luxury market is not without its challenges, in the form of a Chinese economic slowdown and currency fluctuations, Adler feels the luxury market is in good shape. “The outlook is good for global luxury goods,” she confirms. “According to Euromonitor International, sales are forecast to soar from $317 billion in 2015 to $339 billion in 2020. An appetite for sumptuous bags means the leather goods industry is the fastest growing category of luxury worldwide, and online sales are also booming, meaning luxury brands are now looking to recruit digital talent, such as Ian Rogers – a former Apple executive who is now chief digital officer at LVMH.” For Adler, the lure of luxury remains eternal: “There’s nothing quite like the rush that comes with seeing something gorgeous and knowing somewhere inside you that you simply have to have it.”